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Digitisation and Microfilming

Accredited Archive ServiceIfA Registered Organisation

Worcestershire Archive and Archaeology Service

Digitisation and Microfilming Service

Worcestershire Archive and Archaeology Service offer years of expertise in undertaking high quality digitisation and microfilming.  Our experienced and highly skilled staff are able to provide a bespoke service to both individuals and institutions all around the world. Whether you would like a copy of one image for your own personal research or you are an institution requiring a more long-term solution to your digitisation needs; we can help.  

Why Choose to Digitise or Microfilm?

One of the main reasons for making microfilm or digitised copies of documents is for preservation. A high quality, durable copy will reduce the necessity for the original to be consulted, thereby protecting it from damage. Sometimes the original is in a form that cannot be used as it currently stands, such as a glass plate negative, and digitisation is the only way of making it usable.

Our Self-Service Area at The Hive boasts a wide range of resources on microfilm and CD-Rom. The public can consult parish registers, wills, newspapers, maps and Electoral registers to name but a few. By having these popular sources available in surrogate format users are able to access them without needing to ask staff to produce the resources, saving time for both the customer and for staff. More importantly, surrogate copies ensure the preservation of the original records, which would otherwise be put under great strain owing to their popularity.

A particular benefit of digitisation is the ability to manipulate the image. You can incorporate the image into a document, or enhance it to make it more readable, more aesthetically pleasing, etc. You can also publish it online. Online resources can be accessed at any time from anywhere with access to the Internet.

Why Choose Our Digitisation and Microfilming Service?

Worcestershire Archive Service's skilled Microfilming and Digitisation team have years of experience and are able to offer you friendly, hands on advice to make sure you get the finished product you want.

 As an Archive Service we know the unique value of documents and treat all records undergoing microfilming and digitisation with the utmost care. While the records are with us, they are stored in state-of-the-art, secure strongrooms with closely monitored atmospheric conditions.

We use high quality, specialist photographic equipment such as the Congress II microfilming camera on which we can produce approximately 700 high-definition black and white images on a standard 35mm, 30m roll-film. Digital capture is by way of Phase One P30 and P40+ camera systems and supporting software allowing us to produce high-resolution image files up to 114 MB in size in full 24 bit colour. Both systems are designed to give maximum protection to materials while being photographed.

We have an extensive client base, which covers both individuals and corporate bodies. Here are a few examples:

  • University of Birmingham
  • Worcester Cathedral Library
  • Staffordshire Archive Service
  • Herefordshire Record Office
  • Gordon Russell Trust
  • Buckinghamshire Record Office
  • Elgar Birthplace Museum

Using Our Service

If you require large quantities of records digitised or microfilmed, then please contact John France, our Senior Microfilmer and Digitiser, who will be glad to discuss your specific needs. He can be contacted via Telephone: 01905 766357 or by Email: jfrance@worcestershire.gov.uk.

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This page was last reviewed 14 June 2013 at 17:12.
The page is next due for review 11 December 2014.