Child sexual exploitation

Child Sexual Exploitation (CSE) is a form of sexual, emotional and physical abuse of children (age under 18). Sexual abuse may involve physical contact, including assault by penetration (for example, rape or oral sex) or non-penetrative acts such as masturbation, kissing, rubbing and touching outside clothing. It may include non-contact activities, such as involving children in the production of sexual images, forcing children to look at sexual images or watch sexual activities, encouraging children to behave in sexually inappropriate ways or grooming a child in preparation for abuse (including via the internet). 

It can be difficult to recognise the warning signs of CSE as they are similar to the challenges that all parents of teenage or near-teenage children face.

It's important that you know how to spot the signs of CSE, whether you are a parent, young person or a member of the public.

There are lots of useful websites below for parents, carers and the general public. These include more information about what CSE is, how to spot the signs, how to report it as well as advice and support for families who have experienced CSE.

More information about CSE

Website: Safe and Sound - Grooming Models (opens in a new window)

Website: PACE - Keep Them Safe (opens in a new window)

Website: PACE - The Grooming Models (opens in a new window)

Website: PACE - The Grooming Models 'In the Spotlight' (opens in a new window)

Spotting the signs of CSE

Website: Barnardo's (opens in a new window)

Website: NHS Choices - How to Spot Child Sexual Exploitation (opens in a new window)

Website: Parents Against Child Sexual Exploitation (PACE) (opens in a new window)

Website: Parents Protect (opens in a new window)

Website: Safe and Sound (opens in a new window)

Advice and support for families affected by CSE

Website: Parents Against Child Sexual Exploitation (PACE) (opens in a new window)

Website: MOSAC (Mother's of Sexually Abused Children) (opens in a new window)

Website: PACE - The Role of Parents in Child Sexual Exploitation Investigations (February 2015) (opens in a new window)