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Frequently Asked Questions

Cycling - Frequently Asked Questions

Questions

  1. The footway near to where I live is in a poor state of maintenance. How can I go about getting it improved?
  2. How do I put in a request for new infrastructure? E.g. Pedestrian crossings, new footways etc
  3. What kinds of walking schemes have the potential to be funded?
  4. How do you prioritise the requests for walking schemes that you receive?
  5. How long will it take to find out if a walking scheme request has been successful in obtaining funding?
  6. What are the differences between the types of controlled crossings?
  7. Where can I get a map of the routes I can take to get to school / work?
  8. I would like to walk to work but don’t have time - what can I do?
  9. What is a walking bus and how do I set one up?

Answers

  1. Q. The footway near to where I live is in a poor state of maintenance. How can I go about getting it improved?
    A. For any maintenance issues that you would like to report, call 01905 765765 or you can report the fault online.
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  2. Q. How do I put in a request for new infrastructure? E.g. Pedestrian crossings, new footways etc
    A. If you would like to put in a formal request for a crossing, new footway or other walking infrastructure, please put your request in writing and send it to the Sustainable Schemes Team, Safety and Sustainability, Environmental Services, County Hall, Spetchley Road, Worcester, WR5 2NP. Alternatively you can email scheme@worcestershire.gov.uk.
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  3. Q. What kinds of walking schemes have the potential to be funded?
    A. We consider requests for controlled crossings (Pelican, Toucan, Zebra), uncontrolled crossings (lowered kerbs and tactile paving), new footways and pedestrian signing.
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  4. Q. How do you prioritise the requests for walking schemes that you receive?
    A. On receipt of a request a visit to the site is undertaken.  At this site visit, we will look to see if the request is feasible. For example, if the request is for a pelican crossing, we will look at things such as visibility and the speed of the traffic along the road. If the request is feasible, it will then be prioritised using our scoring system. Requests are scored against a number of set criteria considered to encourage more people to walk. These include the potential to reduce car use, increase accessibility, and reduce fear of accidents.

    The level of local support and opportunities for partnership funding are also taken into account.  Once scored the schemes are placed in our priority table. The top scoring schemes are taken forward for possible implementation, depending on available budget.
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  5. Q. How long will it take to find out if a walking scheme request has been successful in obtaining funding?
    A. Every year we receive approximately 50 new requests for walking schemes throughout the County. These requests are assessed and prioritised using the method outlined above. We will write and inform people if their request has been successful at the beginning of the financial year once we have received our funding allocation from central government.
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  6. Q. What are the differences between the types of controlled crossings?
    A. Zebra crossings consist of two black and white poles with orange beacons, and a black and white striped road surface. They can only be used on roads where the speed of 85% of the traffic is below 35mph. They are generally used within urban environments where the need for a controlled crossing has been identified, but traffic speeds are relatively low.

    Pelican crossings are those with traffic lights that provide a ‘green man’ phase for pedestrians. These are generally used either where there are high volumes of people crossing the road, such as in a town centre, or where the road speed is too fast to accommodate a Zebra.

    Toucan crossings are designed for both cyclists and pedestrians. These are essentially the same as Pelican crossings, but in addition to the green man, there is also a bicycle symbol. These crossings tend to be used where an off-road cycle route crosses a busy road.
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  7. Q. Where can I get a map of the routes I can take to get to school / work?
    A. Worcestershire County Council currently produce walk / cycle maps for Malvern, Worcester, Bromsgrove, Pershore the Wyre Forest District, Redditch and Evesham. In the future we also hope to be able to produce maps for the other towns in Worcestershire. These can be viewed from our walking maps page.

    To request a paper copy call 01905 765765.
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  8. Q. I would like to walk to work but don’t have time - what can I do?
    A. At peak times walking to work can actually save you time, especially if you only live a mile or so from your destination. Most people walk at a speed of around 3 miles an hour. This means that a trip to somewhere a mile away will only take 20 minutes to walk, which could be quicker than sitting in peak hour traffic.

    If you don’t live within walking distance of your destination, consider walking just part of the way. This will still help cut down on congestion, save you money on petrol, and help to keep you fit.
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  9. Q. What is a walking bus and how do I set one up?
    A. A Walking Bus is an organised rota of children and parent helpers, who walk to and from school together. The group uses a set route with ‘stops’ along the way.

    The group moves safely under the guidance of trained adults. All children and adults on the bus wear bright reflective jackets for safety. All adult leaders will have a CRB (Criminal Records Bureau) check and full road safety training is given by a County Council Road Safety Officer.
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Further Information

In this section

More Information

See also in our website

External websites

  • Walking the way to Health 
    An initiative of the British Heart Foundation and the Countryside Agency that aims to get more people walking in their own communities on a regular basis.
  • British Heart Foundation
    For advice on improving your health through a more active lifestyle.
  • Ordnance Survey
    For local and national maps and advise on reading maps, including teaching children to read maps.
  • Natural England
    Natural England is the government’s advisor on the natural environment.
  • Rambles Association
    Information on forest walks and the ramblers association.

We are not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more

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This page was last reviewed 25 July 2013 at 15:03.
The page is next due for review 21 January 2015.